Litigation & Class Actions

Class Actions

Outten & Golden attorneys focus on bringing class actions against employers. When employers violate employment laws, they often do so against groups of similar employees at once. In those situations, class actions allow employees to vindicate their rights as a group, which is more efficient economically and creates strength in numbers.

We represent employees who have been victims of unlawful discrimination in the workplace, including harassment by their employers, and employees who have been victims of wage theft by their employers, such as unpaid overtime. Through class action litigation, employees can get the type and breadth of data necessary to prove that an employer has violated the law against them as a group and create company-wide changes to prevent future violations. 

Class action litigation requires a particular expertise, resources, and skills to prosecute successfully. Outten & Golden attorneys have substantial experience prosecuting and settling employment class actions and are well versed in class action law. Outten & Golden has expertise in class litigation recognized by dozens of courts and by workers’ rights organizations that have honored us with prestigious awards for our work in employment class litigation. Outten & Golden is extremely qualified to manage and prosecute complex multi-party class actions on behalf of large numbers of employees. 

(*Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome.)

Related Cases

Munchery, Inc.

Status:
Active
Updated:

Outten & Golden filed a class action suit against Munchery, Inc., ("Munchery") seeking to recover 60 days wages and benefits for former employees under the federal Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification ("WARN") Act and the California Labor Code § 1400 et. seq. (collectively, the "WARN Acts").

Lapeer Industries, Inc.

Status:
Active
Updated:

Outten & Golden filed a class action suit against Lapeer Industries, Inc., ("Lapeer") seeking to recover 60 days wages and benefits for former employees under the federal Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification (WARN) Act (the "WARN Act").

News

“Soñador” demanda a Wells Fargo por supuestamente discriminarlo en préstamo

Hoy Los Angeles - Efe

Un inmigrante mexicano, amparado por el programa de Acción Diferida (DACA), demandó a la entidad financiera Wells Fargo por supuestamente negarle un préstamo basándose en su estatus migratorio, informaron este jueves sus abogados.

En la demanda presentada en un tribunal de San Francisco, Eduardo Peña alega que el banco lo discriminó por su estatus migratorio cuando le negó un préstamo de automóvil en noviembre pasado, a pesar de contar con un buen reporte de crédito, empleo y estar amparado por el programa DACA desde 2012.

La abogada de Peña, Rachel Dempsey, explicó a Efe que “el programa...

Wells Fargo Denies Auto Loans To DACA Residents, Suit Says

Law360 - Dave Simpson

An Illinois man hit Wells Fargo Bank NA with a proposed discrimination class action in California federal court Tuesday, claiming the bank denies auto loan applications from U.S. residents who hold Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals status simply based on their immigration status.

Eduardo Peña said the bank committed alienage discrimination against him and a large number of the 800,000 DACA-status individuals who are financially stable by categorically rejecting their car loan applications because they are not U.S. citizens, in violation of the Civil Rights Act of 1866.

Further, he claims...

JPMorgan Chase settles class-action lawsuit after dad demands equal parental leave for men

The Washington Post - Samantha Schmidt

Before the birth of his second son, Derek Rotondo decided he wanted to spend more time at home — to bond with the newborn and to more evenly split up the caregiving with his wife.

The Ohio father asked his employer, JPMorgan Chase, for the paid parental leave the company offered to primary caregivers. But he was told that in most cases, only mothers would be eligible for the full 16 weeks, Rotondo said. Unless he could prove that his wife had returned to work or was medically incapable of caring for the baby, Rotondo would be eligible for only two weeks of paid leave.

In response, Rotondo ...